RCBM Blog

National No Name-Calling Week

Bullying and teen suicide is a rapidly rising issue in the school systems. No Name-Calling Week was founded to improve community awareness to help in the fight against bullying and is supported by the Safe Schools Improvement Act. Thousands of schools across the nation participate in this awareness every year by integrating educational materials about verbal bullying into their curriculum. By raising awareness staff and students alike can learn the harmful effects of bullying and ways to put an end to it, creating a safe and healthier learning environment.



January is National “Thank you” Month

Danke, grazie, merci, gracias, spasibo, thank you! No matter how you say thank you, say it this month. January is National Thank You Month; feel free to join RCBM in celebrating this month.



Dr. Joel Young interviewed by The Daily Beast

Dr. Joel Young was recently interviewed by Diane Dimond at The Daily Beast / Newsweek about Nancy Lanza, click here to read the article.

Dr. Young Discusses the Aftermath of the Newtown Tragedy

As a forensic psychiatrist, many media outlets are asking for Dr. Young's thoughts about the tragedy in Connecticut.



RCBM’s response to the Sandy Hook tragedy

In the wake of Friday’s unthinkable tragedy in Connecticut, the RCBM staff has begun to discuss ways that we can do our part.  It is easy to feel powerless when something like this happens but important to respond in constructive ways, even if they seem small in the aftermath of such tremendous loss.



Alzheimer’s: A Family Perspective

In honor of Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, our executive director, Jaime Saal, MA, wrote a blog about her family’s experience with Alzheimer’s Disease.



Alzheimer’s Disease: Early Detection and Treatments

Every eight seconds someone turns 50.  According to the Administration on Aging of the Department of Health and Human Services, in 2000 the population of 65 year olds was 35 million, in just eight years it will jump to 55 million.   As a clinical social worker with a keen awareness of the elder community, my interest in gerontology is increasing along with the aging population.  One prominent concern of aging is the possible diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.



Psychosis: Breaking from Reality

Over the last few weeks, those of us who live in Southeastern Michigan have been alerted to a series of shootings along the I-96 corridor. Numerous innocent targets were involved. Many windshields were shattered, and apparently one person sustained injuries. We learned last week that a gentleman in his 40’s was apprehended. There are reports that he has a history of paranoia and psychiatric symptoms. Most people with mental illness do not have violent tendencies, but certain psychiatric diagnoses are associated with increased frequency of violent behavior.



Suicide Attempt: A Family Crisis

I am a survivor of suicide.  This November marks two years since I heard the words; “Your mother tried to kill herself.”  It was one of the scariest moments in my life, but also one of great relief that she had not succeeded, and went on to receive treatment.  Less than a year later, her sister, estranged from the family for more than a decade, would not be so fortunate.



ADHD and the Workplace

Many times during the week we discuss with our ADHD patients best practices to concentrate.  There are a number of distractions in the workplace that make work unproductive and quite frustrating.  The attached article discusses the importance of stopping visual and audio distractions and building blinders into your workspace. A white noise machine could also be helpful.